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Biographies
Dr. Noble began his teaching career at Cave Spring High School in Roanoke, Virginia, developing an award winning band that was selected to represent the Commonwealth of Virginia Lions Clubs at their International Convention in Nice, France in 1962. This was very early in the days of bands traveling on extended tours abroad. The band performed concerts throughout the UK and Western Europe, including a jaunt through then East Germany and into the divided city of Berlin.

He was then appointed graduate assistant in the Band Department of Indiana University where he was assistant conductor of the wind ensemble under Dr. Ronald Gregory and Professor George Roach, assistant conductor of the Indiana University "Marching 100", and was the conductor of the Concert Band and two ROTC bands. Dr. Noble was awarded honorary life membership in both Phi Mu Alpha and Kappa Kappa Psi fraternities. In 1965, he joined the faculty of his alma mater, Shenandoah Conservatory of Music (now Shenandoah University) in Winchester, Virginia, where he became Director of Bands and Chair of the Instrumental Music Department. During his tenure the student enrollment in the music department grew from 90 to over 500 music majors. Many of his former students are professional performers and in top positions at educational institutions across the country.

During this time, he created the All-Student Band, U.S.A., which later included not only bands, but also orchestras, choruses and jazz groups. These groups were made up of high school and college students from across the US, selected by audition, for summer concert tours of Europe. After several European tours, numerous band directors solicited the assistance of the Nobles travel expertise to the point that, with his wife, Mitzi, heading a staff of assistants, they formed Educational Tour Consultants, Inc. to plan and conduct group tours around the world.

In 1976, the Governor of Virginia appointed Paul Noble to form the Official Virginia Bicentennial Band and Marching Chorus, 500 members from the best students across the state. This group participated in the various events of the nation's Bicentennial Celebration, including the visit of Queen Elizabeth II to Virginia.

With the business expanding, Noble decided to devote full time to the travel business, creating both a retail and group travel departments, employing up to 40 people. Together they created music festival opportunities around the world; was the founder of the high school division of the Montreux Jazz Festival; and created Homestays International, a division of their group department focusing on providing inexpensive travel accommodations through free exchange homestays for groups around the world. The Christian Children's Fund engaged them to provide groups tours for sponsors to visit their sponsored children in nine developing countries around the world. Domestically, they produced music festivals for the Six Flags Amusement Parks across the U.S., and with this developed adjudication forms and standards that had a lasting impact on music education and festival standards in America.

In the late 1980s, Mitzi Noble pursued ordination to the Episcopal priesthood, finishing her Master of Divinity degree at The General Theological Seminary in New York City. From there, Paul followed her career as they moved to Long Island, Connecticut, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. In Connecticut, he conducted a civic orchestra, and in Maryland, he conducted the Montgomery College Wind Ensemble. Throughout this time, his creative imagination focused on various forms of art, including oil portraits (some now hanging in New York City), watercolors, pen and ink, and stained glass windows. Some of his art may be seen on: www.nobleartstudio.com. Musically, his arrangement of Johan Halvorsen's "Masquerade Suite" was premiered by the U. S. Navy Band in Washington, D.C., and he conducted and arranged for a professional band and orchestra in commercial CD recordings for tenor Doug Jimerson.

Paul and Mitzi Noble now reside on Smith Mountain Lake in southwest Virginia where they are active in their various pursuits of creativity. For nearly four years Paul has immersed himself into arranging music for Wind Bands/Concert Bands, realising not only its beauty but also its values in music education, artistry, and audience appeal. He believes that the future of publication lies in the computer, and why not! Composers and arrangers can serve as their own publisher without the necessity of their music being reviewed to meet the criteria of a particular publishing house. This is why Bandmusicpdf.net is so important. Here the music is authentic, with some of the greatest compositions faithfully brought to the world of the Wind Band. Most recently Dr. Noble has received a License Agreement from Oxford University Press to create Wind Band arrangements from compositions in their orchestra catalogue, including compositions by John Rutter, William Walton, Gordon Jacob, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Alun Hoddinott, and others.

Bandmusicpdf.net is an Associate Member of the American Bandmasters Association, and has been named a Licensed Edition Publishing Partner of Oxford University Press.  Dr. Noble is the recipient of the 2012 Shenandoah University Distinguished Alumni Award for Lifetime Achievement. 

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At six Philip Lane embarked on formal piano lessons. His teacher, of a conservative turn of mind, when told he played by ear, replied, "Don't worry, he'll grow out of it", and spent most of his pupil's adolescence convincing him that his career lay in the library service. He progressed through the grade exams with modest success into his teens, by which time he was attending the local grammar school, the famous old boys of which included at least two international music figures, Gustav Holst, and Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones. It was there that he took up the organ, mostly as a means of earning pocket money - a half hour funeral (for which his truly enlightened headmaster gave him time off) would pay what his contemporaries took a good many hours in a week or a whole weekend to earn, delivering newspapers or stacking supermarket shelves. 

He also began accompanying a local choral society, and at weekends and holidays working in the record department of the local W.H.Smith, through a golden period of popular music - the Beatles, Stones, Dylan and the like. Perhaps selling so many records gave him the idea that one day he might like to produce a few. During this time he began composing but, in retrospect, to a very limited degree, a few carols, piano pieces, a string quartet, but, significantly, an orchestral Sinfonietta, now withdrawn. The symphony orchestra would be his favourite means of expression thereafter. 

In 1969 Philip Lane went to Birmingham University to read Music. His interview took the form of little more than playing through his piano duet suite, Badinages, later to be his first commercially recorded work, with the professor, Ivor Keys, before being told that he would 'probably be accepted'. His tutors included two composers, John Joubert and Peter Dickinson, but there was little opportunity for composition lessons as such, and he was already excused orchestration class when it was discovered he was already having his orchestral works played by the BBC Midland Light Orchestra just half a mile away at the BBC Studios at Pebble Mill. Despite later encouragement from the Hollywood composer, Bernard Herrmann, then based in London, he considers himself virtually self-taught in both disciplines.

While at university Philip Lane developed an interest in one British composer in particular, as a result of having to write a thesis in his last year. This was Lord Berners (1883 - 1950), composer, novelist, painter and eccentric. On graduation, he gave several radio talks on the subject, and from 1987, acted as a trustee of the Berners Trust overseeing the production of a number of CDs which made available, finally, all Berners' compositions. For much of this time Lane worked freelance for London publishers and taught. From 1975, for the next 23 years, he was on the music staff of the Cheltenham Ladies' College. The musical legacy of these years is the body of works for upper voices which have established themselves in the repertoire of countless choirs around the world.

By chance, in 1993, Lane was invited to look after the musical interests in the estate of Richard Addinsell (1904-77), of Warsaw Concerto fame. One of his first enterprises was to write a radio documentary on the subject, linked to a CD recording (Marco Polo 8.223732) which had to include one of Addinsell's most famous film scores, Goodbye, Mr Chips (1939). Given that the only surviving material was a voice and piano version of the School Song, he set to work to take down the Main Titles from the video by ear. The success of this disc led to his being asked to do similar work on the early British films of Sir Alfred Hitchcock - The Thirty-Nine Steps, The Lady Vanishes and others. Since then he has supervised the reconstruction of numerous scores, most recently, single composer compilation albums of Arnold, Alwyn, Auric, Bliss, and two more of Addinsell, including one almost complete score, Victor Young's for The Quiet Man.

In recent years, much of Lane's work has been in the commercial field, library music, music for BBC plays, including The Merchant of Venice and Sir Thomas More, and TV animation, including the immortal Captain Pugwash, but he has not deserted the world of live music-making, with choral commissions to mark the centenary of the death of Lewis Carroll, one from the winners of the Sainsbury Choir of the Year, and a ballet, Hansel and Gretel, for the National Youth Ballet.   He also has added several new seasonal works to his catalogue  setting of The Night Before Christmas for narrator and orchestra was a best selling CD with Stephen Fry and the BBC Concert Orchestra.   Live performances followed all over the UK, in the USA and even in the Far East.  This was followed in 2009 by Another Night Before Christmas, an updated retelling of the story to a text by Carol Ann Duffy, the present UK Poet Laureate, premiered by the Royal Liverpool PO.   Also that year came a commission from the Boston Pops to write their annual major work for the Holiday Pops season.   The result was The Christmas Story for narrator, SATB choir and orchestra which played for over 30 performances in December 2009 under music director, Keith Lockhart.

Most recently Philip Lane was awarded the Honorary Doctor of Music degree from Gloucestershire University.

Along with his love for composition, Dr. Lane also maintains his interests in literature, science, cricket, competitive music, jazz and international sporting events.
Bandmusicpdf.net

Paul Noble is a native Virginian and has spent much of his life in Virginia.   32nd great-grandson of Alfred the Great, King of England from 871-899 A.D., his affinity for the Cotswolds, Gloucestershire, Winchester,   Cheltenham, and the people from that part of England created an immediate bond between him and English composer Philip Lane.   He began arranging music for bands and jazz ensembles while still in high school, and continued his interest in arranging throughout his undergraduate and graduate studies.   With degrees from Shenandoah Conservatory of Music, Indiana University, The Catholic University of America, and with additional graduate studies at the Universities of Michigan and Virginia, he has taught music and conducted at every level from elementary through university and professional performing ensembles. 

Philip Lane was born in Cheltenham, the English spa town at the foot of the Cotswold Hills made famous by visits from George III and a place of festivals, National Hunt Racing, literature, competitive cricket and international music, but as he grew up in the 1950s, it was still a very parochial spot, some hundred miles from London. The family possessed an old harmonium on which he tried to play from a very early age; seeing he had some interest in music, this was soon replaced with an upright piano which proved a more responsive vehicle for his improvising - or 'playing by ear' as it was called. Any sort of tune he heard, popular, religious or occasionally classical, was a suitable 'case for treatment'. 

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