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​                                                "Prelude and Fugue" (The Spitfire) is included on the required Grade 4.0 list for the 
                                       British National Concert Band Festival.





Prelude and Fugue (The Spitfire)                       Listen                                      View        7:30     Adv.      US$75.00         Purchase 
William Walton   
Performed by the Indiana University Wind Ensemble, Prof. Stephen Pratt, Conductor, for the 2012 American Bandmasters Association Convention in Indianapolis, Indiana

The Prelude and Fugue (The Spitfire) by William Walton represents the first in a series of Concert Band arrangements by Paul Noble under a License Agreement with Oxford University Press.  The music, written to accompany the film, The First of the Few, was the film story of the designer of the Spitfire fighter aircraft, R. J. Mitchell.  This work was lifted, almost bodily out of the film score: exceptionally (for film music) it needed hardly any modification to turn it into a first-rate concert piece.
The prelude, called by Stephen Lloyd "one of Walton's finest marches", is the music heard over the opening credit titles in the movie. A central lyrical solo depicts the exhaustion and dying by illness of the aircraft's designer R. J. Mitchell. The fugue is used to describe the making of the Spitfire, and then the patriotic march returns joined with the fugue to mark the completion of the fighter aircraft.
The majestic march-like drama of the Prelude is well-suited for graduation and other ceremonial events, and the total piece is a tour de force for contest performance. 
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Crown Imperial                                                                   Listen         View     9:30     Adv.        US$125.00          Purchase
William Walton                                                       Performance by the University of North Texas Wind Ensemble, Nicholas Williams, conductor
Crown Imperial: A Coronation March (1937) was composed for, and first performed at, the coronation service for King George VI in Westminster Abbey, London, on 12 May 1937 by the Coronation Orchestra, conducted by Sir Adrian Boult.   It has been an important piece for the band repertoire for a number of years, now out of print. This new arrangement is intended to continue the legacy and availability of a great piece for Concert/Wind Bands.
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Orb and Sceptre                                                                            Listen        View       8:00      Adv.          US$85.00          Purchase
William Walton                                                    Performance by the Indiana University Wind Ensemble, Prof. Stephen Pratt, conductor
This music was composed in 1952/1953 for the coronation of  Queen Elizabeth II on 2 June 1953.  It has been an important piece for the band repertoire for a number of years, now out of print.  This new arrangement is intended to continue the legacy and availability of a great piece for Concert/Wind Bands.
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Prelude to Richard III                                                               Listen          View      7:20   Med-Adv.   US$60.00         Purchase
William Walton
  Performed by the Birmingham (U.K.) Symphonic Winds, Keith Allen, Conductor
In 1955, Walton received two honorary doctorates: from the Universities of Cambridge and London. He also composed this Shakespeare film music for Laurence Olivier, "Richard III", one of three Shakespearean film scores by Walton.  The music in "Prelude to Richard III" is not duplicated in "A Shakespeare Suite" from Richard III which follows next in sequence.  Each piece is a complement to the other, and would be a perfect pair on a concert program.
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A Shakespeare Suite,  from "Richard III"               Listen          View     10:15    Med-Adv.  US$70.00         Purchase
William Walton
1.  Fanfare
2.  Music Plays
3.  The Princes in the Tower
4.  With Drum and Colours
5.  I would I knew thy heart
6.  Trumpets Sound

This music was composed in 1955 for the film "Richard III" and has been adapted for orchestral concert use by Muir Mathieson, and this Concert Band arrangement by Paul Noble.  The orchestra version has been recorded on Columbia Records by the Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer, under the title "Shakespeare Film Music".

Concert Bands will find this music to be quite accessible, with abundant doubling, as was in the original scoring.  The quality of William Walton's compositions should make this adaptation a "must" for festival performance, and a delight for audiences with an interesting touch of Renaissance.
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Suite from 'Henry V'                                                            Listen            View    15:40 + opt. narration  Med. to Adv.   US$300.00  Purchase  
                                                                                                                                                                   of additional 5 - 6 minutes
The "Suite from Henry V" is an arrangement for Concert Band and optional narrator, adapted from the 1963 orchestral arrangement of William Walton's musical score from the 1944 film Henry V. The suite, originally arranged for orchestra by Muir Mathieson, is in five movements, and occupies a very significant role in the history of music and of Shakespearean studies. Performances exist in a variety of formats because the adaptation of the narration to a film suite is subject to choice. To be chronologically correct, the order of movements from the original suite has been altered to adhere to the narration of the play. And the choice of speeches has required considerable research by classicists who are familiar with the writings of Shakespeare. It has been the endeavour of this arranger to research and present this suite in as authentic a manner as possible, understanding that it might well become the standard by which Concert Bands of the future will adapt and present this music. The arranger is indebted to Anna Warren, a resident of Twickenham and a graduate in Modern Languages (French and Italian) and History from the University of Bristol and a postgraduate from The Institute of Education, the University of London, for her knowledge and insight into the formation of the narration.
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Johannesburg Festival Overture                              Listen               View      7:50         Adv.      US$150.00         Purchase
William Walton 
Johannesburg Festival Overture was composed for orchestra by William Walton for the 70th anniversary of Johannesburg, South Africa in 1956.
Walton received the commission from Ernest Fleischmann, musical director of the Johannesburg Festival Committee, to celebrate the seventieth anniversary of the city. Fleischmann included in his request to include some African themes. For inspiration he requested recordings of African music from the African Music Society. The effect of these recordings can be heard with percussionists performing on eleven instruments. The composer also incorporated the main theme from Jean Bosco Mwenda's "Masanga" (which had been released on record in 1954). An interesting use of this original material can be heard on: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvsP9i0xovs

Walton described the piece to his publisher as "a non-stop gallop...slightly crazy, hilarious and vulgar." This arrangement for Concert band captures the color, excitement, and energy of the original orchestra work, and should become a staple in the repertoire of excellent bands.
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The First Shoot - William Walton                                        Listen                    View      8:45    Med -Adv.  US $60.00         Purchase
1.  Giocoso 
2.  Andantino
3.  A tempo di "Hesitation Waltz"
4.  A tempo, sub. Vivace
5.  Vivace

Occupying an important historical position between his better-known colleagues Ralph Vaughan Williams and Benjamin Britten, William Walton is seen by many as the first modern British composer to approach the brilliance and vitality which characterized English music during Handel's day.  Born in northwest England, Walton was the son of a choirmaster, and appropriately, served as a chorister at Christ Church Cathedral at Oxford from 1912 to 1918. Studies at the university itself proved unsatisfying, and William left Oxford without a degree in 1920, relying instead upon the patronage of the Sitwell family, who had befriended the young composer. Through the influence of this affluent and well-known family, Walton was able to break into the London music scene, and by 1922 his chamber piece "Facade" had achieved some popularity with the concert-going public. Much like his contemporaries Poulenc and Prokofiev, Walton was at heart an expressive, lyric composer; his music is a sparkling synthesis of old and new. 

"The First Shoot" was written and first performed in 1935 for the ballet "Follow the Sun".  The original music was lost, but reconstructed for brass band, and later for orchestra by Christopher Palmer.  This Concert Band arrangement is based on that orchestra score.  It is a charming look back (one can imagine the music that might have accompanied a Charlie Chaplin movie!)  Concert bands will experience a worthwhile challenge in bringing this wonderfully tuneful music to their audiences, as well as the broadening of their own musical experience. 
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March for 'A History of the                                     Listen          View​     4:45   Med-Adv.       US$35.00        Purchase
English-Speaking Peoples'                   Performance by the Indiana University Wind Ensemble, Stephan Pratt, Conductor.
William Walton

In 1959, William Walton was commissioned to compose music for the opening and closing credits of a television series based on Winston Churchill's History of the English-speaking Peoples. The resulting work, March for the History of the English-speaking Peoples, was recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra in May of that year and later published by Oxford University Press. However, the television project never materialized, and consequently Walton's score, which might have become one of his more familiar among popular audiences through television exposure, was all but forgotten. With the moderate surge in popularity that Walton's music enjoyed in the last decade of the twentieth century, this and other little-known pieces have become available for consideration.

Concert Bands will enjoy the majesty and drama of this piece, very appropriate for concerts, ceremonies, and graduations.
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Macbeth                                                                                            Listen              View     5:50   Med. Adv         US$75.00         Purchase  
The following program notes are taken from those by Christopher Palmer, the arranger for orchestra from William Walton's incidental music for John Gielgud's production of Macbeth in 1941-42. "The music was recorded and taken on tour with the production. Up to now it has remained in manuscript and unknown. Although I call this piece 'Fanfare and March' the principal 'march' is in fact the banquet music (with its clever suggestion of bagpipes on the woodwind - hence my ad lib parts for extra flutes and oboes). Walton made several different versions of this for dramatic purposes, and I have pieced some of them together. The central section of 'Trio' is the 'March' ('Show') of the Eight Kings (Act 4, Scene 1) which reveals to Macbeth that Banquo's issue, not his, will rule in Scotland."
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Portsmouth Point                                                                     Listen              View     5:30   Adv.                  US$100.00    Purchase
Portsmouth Point is an overture originally composed in 1925 for orchestra by the English composer William Walton. The work was inspired by the well-known painting depicting Portsmouth Point by Thomas Rowlandson. Portsmouth Point depicts in musical form the rumbustious life of British 18th century sailors.  Commentators have noted the influence of Igor Stravinsky's music and of jazz in the rhythms of the score, as well as the rhythm of the Catalan sardana dance.   This arrangement brings a challenging addition to the repertoire of the Concert/Wind Band, with its pointallistic rhythm and dissonances, somewhat typical of  somewhat typical of  Walton in this period of his life.
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The Barber of Seville Goes to the Devil                     Listen                  View     4:20    Adv.              US$35.00        Purchase
Gordon Jacob 
                             Gordon Jacob (1895-1984), one of Malcolm Arnold's teachers at the Royal College of Music, was represented in the first Hoffnung
                             This rumbustious parody of Rossini's style was composed in 1960 for the BBC Concert Orchestra, which introduced it under 
                             Vilm Tausky in a broadcast concert that year. (Tausky added the opening bars, in fact, with the composer's approval, which 
                              are included in this arrangement.) The piece is a no-holds-barred workout on familiar material such as could be brought off 
                              only by a certified master of the modern orchestra with a free-wheeling imaginativeness to match his/her technical skill. Concert 
                             Bands and their audiences will get in on the fun of this rousing parody, exploring everything from a Spanish dance to a Street
                             parade.
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A Fugal Overture                                                                                Listen       View    5:00    Adv.    US$75.00           Purchase
​                                                                   
Gustav Holst (1874-1934)
                              Gustav Holst is well-known among band directors, especially for his First and Second Suites for Band, The Planets, and
                              Hammersmith. His combination of sound practical musicianship, an inquiring and speculative intelligence¸ and the democratic
                              approach to music and music-making he shared with his friend Vaughan Williams, give him a special place among the heroes 
                             of the 20th century flowering of English music. Holst was born in 1874 in Cheltenham, England, where he spent most of his life. 
                             He pursued his career as a composer studying at the Royal College of Music under Charles Villiers Stanford. Unable to support
                             himself by his compositions, he played the trombone professionally, and later became a teacher—a great one, according to 
                             his colleague Ralph Vaughan Williams. Among other teaching activities he built up a strong tradition of performance at 
                           Morley College, where he served as musical director from 1907 until 1924, and pioneered music education for women at St. Paul’s Girls School, where he taught from 1905 until his death in 1934, raising standards and so laying the foundation for several professional musicians. Holst's works were played frequently in the early years of the 20th century, but it was not until the international success of The Planets in the years immediately after the First World War that he became a well-known figure. A shy man, he did not welcome this fame, and preferred to be left in peace to compose and teach.
He began composition of A Fugal Overture in 1922, completing the full score in January 1923. Despite its name, the overture is not strictly fugal. It belongs to the era of neo-classicism, but apparently by coincidence, for Holst had not yet heard some of the Stravinsky and Hindemith works which set this fashion. The “fugal” subject is full of spiky cross-rhythms – Holst grouped the eighth notes (quavers) of his 4/4 into a pattern of 3 + 3 + 2, thus giving a bar of three unequal beats. The piece is intense and exciting, and should make an important addition to the repertoire of the Concert Band.


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